Category Archives: Tailoring

Incroyables Coat: Rock Star Clothing

Custom tailoring for Douglas Hunter, a Salt Lake music legend and one of PorchFest‘s founders.  An Incroyables coat in electric blue corduroy with blue leopard fur.
We adore Hunter and the way he looks here in Simon Blundell‘s photos.

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Les-Incroyables

Costume historians differ a bit on the subject of the Incroyables, but generally agree that the wild fashion trends of this hipster-punk subculture developed in reaction to the Reign of Terror, 1793–1794, when even aristocrats’ servants and others merely associated with aristocrats could be and were being executed.  We are told that the giant lapels, shaggy haircuts, bows and scarves of the Incroyables should be understood as an exaggerated mockery or aping of aristocratic fashion.  Wikipedia reminds us that “Incroyable was an 18th-century French nickname for a yo-yo, then a fashionable toy.” The women’s (Merveilleuses’) fashions spawned even more talk and scandal.

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Mini-Me

We tailored a custom suit for Mini-Me.
Yes, that Mini Me. Mr. Verne Troyer himself.

 

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Utah computer hardware giant Fusion IO hired Verne to help them announce their new product at a major tech convention, and they wanted him costumed thusly.

 

However, Mr.Troyer did not own a Mini Me costume. The Austin Powers films by this time were already over 11 years old and any costume pieces that might have been saved from those movies were long gone, unavailable for rental.

 

So Fusion hired us to create one. A custom jacket and trousers.  I was super excited, expecting to have Mr. Troyer in the shop with us to hang out, sign some headshots and take a bunch of fun selfies, etc. But that never happened.

 

The only thing the producer gave me was a sheet of measurements. They were fairly complete but also absolutely unbelievable. I couldn’t find out who had taken them or when they were taken. There was no shop info or tailor’s phone number in L.A. to call to confirm anything.

 

Nervewrackingly, I made the outfit, duplicating the iconic Mini-Me costume from the films, scratching my head the whole time, saying, “this can’t be right, this can’t be right.” But it was.

 

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The producers picked it up, paid their balance, and went on their way. I checked in with them about a week later and they told me the suit looked fantastic, that Mr. Troyer loved it, and that he wanted one of his own to wear in case he was asked to appear again as the Mini-Me character.
“Great,” I said, could you put me in touch with his management?” And they said they would, and then things got busy and well, yeah it never happened.

 

I wondered why they didn’t just give Mr. Troyer the costume as a thank-you takeaway. Like, who else would it have possibly fit? The measurements corresponded to a few standard toddler sizes but there would definitely have been some issues. I’ve always wondered if someone at Fusion took the costume home and dressed up their kid as Mini Me for Halloween! I guess I’ll just never know.

 

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Fusion IO’s YouTube video was shot live. It’s a film inside a film.  The video’s aspect ration is vertical and doesn’t showcase the great technical details and fit of the costume. We never did get any still photos of Mr. Troyer wearing it. But we are nonetheless very proud of this project.

 

Through custom tailoring and styling, my staff and I have dressed many celebrities and models. We’re usually quiet about these events, honoring the trade we are in and its long tradition of discretion.  I don’t think I’ve publicly talked about the story of Mr. Troyer before.  Dredging up files from old hard drives results in this sort of reflection, as well as other thoughts.

 

And these involve telling you a sort of cautionary tale about how you should be careful what you ask for.

 

Around 2004, I was moving our original Pierpont Avenue studio from its loft space to downstairs into a newly available storefront. It was pretty exciting. On impulse one day at a second-hand store, I bought a babydoll with a squeeze feature in his tummy. He’d say one of several pre-recorded things. “I love you.” “Nighty-night.” Or, “hehehehehe.” It was, in truth, a little creepy and visitors sometimes freaked when they saw or heard him. He hung on a peg in fairly plain view, and the key to our basement was attached around his little neck.

 

My idea was that we needed an official key that everyone could always identify, find quickly, and that wouldn’t get accidentally locked downstairs or get lost. This little doll was like our hall pass.  “Grab Verne and follow me,” I’d shout sometimes, “we have to go find those doublets or that file or whatever in the basement.”

 

We’ve since moved from our Pierpont Avenue shop. At our new location, our shop’s basement doesn’t have a lock at the top of its stairs. But I still have Verne. He’s a keepsake. He’s worn a number of different costumes over the years, including a tuxedo vest first sported by a bottle of fancy whisky, given to us by a client.

 

Our Verne is silent now, his squeeze-y talking device batteries long depleted, the whole apparatus dissected from the zippered opening on his back long ago. A few years back, Sora, one of our most awesome interns, lovingly sharpied in his third eye. Our old basement key is still attached around his neck. He still hangs on a peg. This time in my office.  I’ve reflected often over the years about the vagaries of sympathetic magic, but have never experienced a better example of its wily nature.

 

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Weddings with Tradition

Custom wedding attire for the wonderful Karl and Rebecca.

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We engineered Rebecca’s four-piece dress to match her illustrations (she is a very talented artist and author). We created a suit for Karl, too.  His is an elegant grey wool frock coat with matching trousers, plus colorful vest, period shirt and a custom hat we had JW Hats make for us, here in Salt Lake City.

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When it’s ungathered, the skirt we made for Rebecca is over 10 feet long! Eight seams with casing and cord inside her skirt gather it all up into the lovely Austrian folds, topped by an elegant bustle. She also wears a custom corset we built to go underneath her custom bodice. Everything is white satin with very little trimming or embroidery, as per guidelines for Temple weddings.  We stabilized both her corset and outer bodice with steels to create a smooth, hourglass silhouette. We love how Karl and Rebecca look and we adore them both:) Very proud of this custom tailoring/dressmaking project.

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Making History: Victorian Dress

Historical anniversaries bring re-enactors and history buffs out of the woodwork, so we thought we’d add some youthful vigor to the Transcontinental Railroad Anniversary shenanigans by creating a lovely dress and sending our intern, the lovely Anna, to join in on the fun.

 

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The Union Pacific’s tracks joined the Central Pacific’s tracks on May 10, 1869, in Promontory, Utah.

 

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We took our pattern from a museum book featuring mid-1800’s dress patterns and created the outfit in a nice calico. We adore how bright and cheerful Anna looks, amidst all the dark, dour costumes around her. They look like they’re dressed for a funeral and she looks like she’s dressed for a party:)

 

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Tea dyed, linen frog closures adorn the front of her bodice plus tiny crochet lace trim on her collar and sleeves that are also finished with teeny burgundy piping. We created a straw hat for her with the matching fabric, too. Anna is wearing a corset and hoop underneath, plus a rounded ‘pillow’ to fill out her bodice, giving her the accurate monobosom silhouette of the period.

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Custom Mascots: Rocky Mountain Power’s “Slim” the Lineman

Wally Wattsmart, also known as “Slim” the Lineman.

We built him for the Riester agency’s client, Rocky Mountain Power. Slim is a regular sighting at civic gatherings, parades, Salt Lake Bees baseball games and many other events.

We created duplicate “Slim” mascots, and master effects artist Chris Richard Hanson developed the custom heads for us.

Rocky Mountain Power urges you, too, to be “wattsmart”.

 

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Slim, walking tall at Salt Lake City’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. But he is not wearing green!

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Custom muscles that breathe, so the performer stays cool.

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Chris, showing custom sculpt and casting in progress, looking at us through Slim’s perspective.

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Wally Wattsmart concept drawings

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Custom Tutus: Combat Ready

 

Unusual project from the archives, one for which a script did not even exist prior to the costumes being built.

 

Jen built the combat tutus purely as an art-for-art’s-sake collection then produced a performance with choreographer extraordinaire, Julie McDaniel who directed a lovely group of dancers in 2007.

 

Fun fact for those who may not know: A ‘tutu’ is not a frilly skirt. A tutu is a two-piece garment that combines a fitted bodice with a frilled brief. Both are usually held together with hooks and are sometimes even sewn together.

 

The clever “Jewelry Massacres” are by artist Justina Parsons-Bernstein, who designed each to accompany a specific tutu.

 

The tutus and jewelry massacre ensembles have been presented in several gallery exhibits and are now part of the McGrews’ Permanent Collection.  We can make one just for you from whatever camo fabric or other fabric you wish. We can also make you a skirt instead of a tutu bottom with a frilled brief. Give us a call at 801-596-2210.