Category Archives: costumes

costumes

Custom Superhero Costume: Littlest Wonder Woman – Josh Rossi Photography

Famous Photographer, Famous Daughter

 

 

A project that’s had 33 million views and counting as of January 2017.

 

When Jessica Alba, George Takei, plus even the new Wonder Woman film director Patty Jenkins are talking about your work, trust us, it’s pretty cool.

 

McGrew Studios and Josh Rossi Photography have wanted to work together on a project for several years, and at last we finally have!

 

10/20/2016

 

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The convergence of his daughter Nellee’s 3rd birthday,  the 75th anniversary of Wonder Woman, Halloween 2016, plus the new Wonder Woman movie trailer all culminated in a personal project for Josh that hit viral status within just several days.  As Josh told KSL TV in an interview at our studio, “All the trending buttons have been hit with both the timing and subject matter of his project,” (not to mention Full Time Photographer‘s original click-bait article title that waves a design and labor rate in readers’ faces).

 

 

Josh’s project has generated a BIG range of discussion, contention, admiration and even scorn– throughout comment threads on all the websites that have reposted the project or created their own new features about it.

 

At McGrews, we are naturally just agog at all this activity and very proud to have played our role in this fantastic project.

 

Some of the videos, articles and links:

 

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Nellee is one cool, three-year old superhero!

 

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Costume made by McGrews’ cartel members Jennifer McGrew with Diane Thompson, plus custom sword and shield by Randy Crit Killen. We love how great Josh’s photos make our work look:)

 

We made Nellee’s costume using several types of leathers along with worbla details, lacing, grommets and a variety of trimmings. We designed her leather bodice to be adjustable in the back as well as on the sides, because she will grow fast!

 

Her leather skirt pieces are sewn onto their own waistband which is attached under the bodice, and this whole element is alterable so it can also be adjused as she grows. Nelee’s armored spats lace up over her boots and should also endure two or more shoe-size increases. We made Nellee’s shoulder straps expandable, and for adjustability over time,  plus created her pauldrons to slide on her straps.

 

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Something Josh brought up after the KSL interview at our shop was the idea of creating and marketing patterns for kids’ costumes. Based on the overwhelming response to this project’s release on the web, it’s something we may seriously consider.

 

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We wanted this costume to be something that replicates the cinematic version and something that she’ll enjoy for a long time. We predict she may wear it until she is five or older!

 

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Would you like a pattern for this Wonder Woman costume that you could create for your own 2-4 year old? Tell us what you think.

 

Tags:

wonder woman toddler photography surreal kid photography child photography comic con photography comic con cosplay cosplay fashion wonder woman outfit marvel costume DC comics wonder woman costume dad spends $1500 on daughters costume josh rossi photography full time photographer

Props and effects wizard Crit Randy Killen’s process photos.
He made Nellee’s Wonder Woman sword and shield.

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Crit even made a cool bag for Nellee’s sword and shield.

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Johnny Killen helped his dad, Crit, with this project.

 

 

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Sword and shield delivered to Josh!

 

Follow and see more from Crit on Facebook-

Barf Pockets

Definitely as awesome as they sound.
Sometimes all a costume needs are the final detailed additions– in this case, new POCKETS!

Heroically, two pairs of khaki trousers sacrificed themselves to become the new pockets and dropseat we added to Bill’s existing coveralls.  Now he is the essence of “Barf” from Mel Brooks’ hilarious Spaceballs film.

Thanks, Bill for having us make your new pockets and for sharing your photos.

May the schwartz be with you!

Photos: Mark Loertscher Photography

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Incroyables Coat: Rock Star Clothing

Custom tailoring for Douglas Hunter, a Salt Lake music legend and one of PorchFest‘s founders.  An Incroyables coat in electric blue corduroy with blue leopard fur.
We adore Hunter and the way he looks here in Simon Blundell‘s photos.

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Costume historians differ a bit on the subject of the Incroyables, but generally agree that the wild fashion trends of this hipster-punk subculture developed in reaction to the Reign of Terror, 1793–1794, when even aristocrats’ servants and others merely associated with aristocrats could be and were being executed.  We are told that the giant lapels, shaggy haircuts, bows and scarves of the Incroyables should be understood as an exaggerated mockery or aping of aristocratic fashion.  Wikipedia reminds us that “Incroyable was an 18th-century French nickname for a yo-yo, then a fashionable toy.” The women’s (Merveilleuses’) fashions spawned even more talk and scandal.

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Mini-Me

We tailored a custom suit for Mini-Me.
Yes, that Mini Me. Mr. Verne Troyer himself.

 

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Utah computer hardware giant Fusion IO hired Verne to help them announce their new product at a major tech convention, and they wanted him costumed thusly.

 

However, Mr.Troyer did not own a Mini Me costume. The Austin Powers films by this time were already over 11 years old and any costume pieces that might have been saved from those movies were long gone, unavailable for rental.

 

So Fusion hired us to create one. A custom jacket and trousers.  I was super excited, expecting to have Mr. Troyer in the shop with us to hang out, sign some headshots and take a bunch of fun selfies, etc. But that never happened.

 

The only thing the producer gave me was a sheet of measurements. They were fairly complete but also absolutely unbelievable. I couldn’t find out who had taken them or when they were taken. There was no shop info or tailor’s phone number in L.A. to call to confirm anything.

 

Nervewrackingly, I made the outfit, duplicating the iconic Mini-Me costume from the films, scratching my head the whole time, saying, “this can’t be right, this can’t be right.” But it was.

 

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The producers picked it up, paid their balance, and went on their way. I checked in with them about a week later and they told me the suit looked fantastic, that Mr. Troyer loved it, and that he wanted one of his own to wear in case he was asked to appear again as the Mini-Me character.
“Great,” I said, could you put me in touch with his management?” And they said they would, and then things got busy and well, yeah it never happened.

 

I wondered why they didn’t just give Mr. Troyer the costume as a thank-you takeaway. Like, who else would it have possibly fit? The measurements corresponded to a few standard toddler sizes but there would definitely have been some issues. I’ve always wondered if someone at Fusion took the costume home and dressed up their kid as Mini Me for Halloween! I guess I’ll just never know.

 

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Fusion IO’s YouTube video was shot live. It’s a film inside a film.  The video’s aspect ration is vertical and doesn’t showcase the great technical details and fit of the costume. We never did get any still photos of Mr. Troyer wearing it. But we are nonetheless very proud of this project.

 

Through custom tailoring and styling, my staff and I have dressed many celebrities and models. We’re usually quiet about these events, honoring the trade we are in and its long tradition of discretion.  I don’t think I’ve publicly talked about the story of Mr. Troyer before.  Dredging up files from old hard drives results in this sort of reflection, as well as other thoughts.

 

And these involve telling you a sort of cautionary tale about how you should be careful what you ask for.

 

Around 2004, I was moving our original Pierpont Avenue studio from its loft space to downstairs into a newly available storefront. It was pretty exciting. On impulse one day at a second-hand store, I bought a babydoll with a squeeze feature in his tummy. He’d say one of several pre-recorded things. “I love you.” “Nighty-night.” Or, “hehehehehe.” It was, in truth, a little creepy and visitors sometimes freaked when they saw or heard him. He hung on a peg in fairly plain view, and the key to our basement was attached around his little neck.

 

My idea was that we needed an official key that everyone could always identify, find quickly, and that wouldn’t get accidentally locked downstairs or get lost. This little doll was like our hall pass.  “Grab Verne and follow me,” I’d shout sometimes, “we have to go find those doublets or that file or whatever in the basement.”

 

We’ve since moved from our Pierpont Avenue shop. At our new location, our shop’s basement doesn’t have a lock at the top of its stairs. But I still have Verne. He’s a keepsake. He’s worn a number of different costumes over the years, including a tuxedo vest first sported by a bottle of fancy whisky, given to us by a client.

 

Our Verne is silent now, his squeeze-y talking device batteries long depleted, the whole apparatus dissected from the zippered opening on his back long ago. A few years back, Sora, one of our most awesome interns, lovingly sharpied in his third eye. Our old basement key is still attached around his neck. He still hangs on a peg. This time in my office.  I’ve reflected often over the years about the vagaries of sympathetic magic, but have never experienced a better example of its wily nature.

 

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Custom Mascots: Clinique

Custom mascot costumes for Clinique.

In face-hiding as well as face-revealing varieties, at the preference of each store’s regional manager.

Katrina Kirkland, Naia Folidei and Rory Sepulveda pose in costumes designed as popular Clinique Cosmetics products at the grand opening of the Meier & Frank in Riverdale. The one-story department store is the eighth in Utah to open and is expected to generate between $200,000 and $300,000 in annual sales tax revenue to the city. (Robert Hirschi/The Salt Lake Tribune)

Katrina Kirkland, Naia Folidei and Rory Sepulveda pose in costumes designed as popular Clinique Cosmetics products at the grand opening of the Meier & Frank in Riverdale. The one-story department store is the eighth in Utah to open and is expected to generate between $200,000 and $300,000 in annual sales tax revenue to the city. (Robert Hirschi/The Salt Lake Tribune)

 

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To ‘hide’ or to ‘reveal’ is always an interesting consideration when you plan to create a walkaround or mascot for your business or product. The face-revealers interact the most purposefully with shoppers, passing out free samples during a department store grand opening.  The anonymous mascara-wearer is far more mischievous and sees through a scrim of metallic fabric.  For all twelve of these costumes we used high density closed cell foam and replicated the Clinique logos with pretty satin-stitch embroidery over appliques.

 

Katrina Kirkland, Naia Folidei and Rory Sepulveda pose in costumes designed as popular Clinique Cosmetics products at the grand opening of the Meier & Frank in Riverdale. The one-story department store is the eighth in Utah to open and is expected to generate between $200,000 and $300,000 in annual sales tax revenue to the city. (Robert Hirschi/The Salt Lake Tribune)

Katrina Kirkland, Naia Folidei and Rory Sepulveda pose in costumes designed as popular Clinique Cosmetics products at the grand opening of the Meier & Frank in Riverdale. The one-story department store is the eighth in Utah to open and is expected to generate between $200,000 and $300,000 in annual sales tax revenue to the city. (Robert Hirschi/The Salt Lake Tribune)

Weddings with Tradition

Custom wedding attire for the wonderful Karl and Rebecca.

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We engineered Rebecca’s four-piece dress to match her illustrations (she is a very talented artist and author). We created a suit for Karl, too.  His is an elegant grey wool frock coat with matching trousers, plus colorful vest, period shirt and a custom hat we had JW Hats make for us, here in Salt Lake City.

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When it’s ungathered, the skirt we made for Rebecca is over 10 feet long! Eight seams with casing and cord inside her skirt gather it all up into the lovely Austrian folds, topped by an elegant bustle. She also wears a custom corset we built to go underneath her custom bodice. Everything is white satin with very little trimming or embroidery, as per guidelines for Temple weddings.  We stabilized both her corset and outer bodice with steels to create a smooth, hourglass silhouette. We love how Karl and Rebecca look and we adore them both:) Very proud of this custom tailoring/dressmaking project.

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Making History: Victorian Dress

Historical anniversaries bring re-enactors and history buffs out of the woodwork, so we thought we’d add some youthful vigor to the Transcontinental Railroad Anniversary shenanigans by creating a lovely dress and sending our intern, the lovely Anna, to join in on the fun.

 

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The Union Pacific’s tracks joined the Central Pacific’s tracks on May 10, 1869, in Promontory, Utah.

 

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We took our pattern from a museum book featuring mid-1800’s dress patterns and created the outfit in a nice calico. We adore how bright and cheerful Anna looks, amidst all the dark, dour costumes around her. They look like they’re dressed for a funeral and she looks like she’s dressed for a party:)

 

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Tea dyed, linen frog closures adorn the front of her bodice plus tiny crochet lace trim on her collar and sleeves that are also finished with teeny burgundy piping. We created a straw hat for her with the matching fabric, too. Anna is wearing a corset and hoop underneath, plus a rounded ‘pillow’ to fill out her bodice, giving her the accurate monobosom silhouette of the period.

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